I love the ‘eureka’ moments, when something that I have been trying to do or understand falls into place.

I love the ‘eureka’ moments, when something that I have been trying to do or understand falls into place.

Prof Louise Bradley

Associate Professor in Physics, Light-Matter interaction

What’s your favourite thing about working where you do?

I get to discover new things all the time and to work with highly motivated and enthusiastic students. Life is never boring. There are always interesting challenges and no two days are the same. Most of all, I love the ‘eureka’ moments, when something that I have been trying to do or understand falls into place.

You conduct research in university. What kind of stuff are you working on?

My research group investigates new physics and applications of light-matter interaction from telecommunications to nanoscale optics. I also teach undergraduate students and help them with their projects and laboratory work. 

What are the most exciting developments happening in your field at the moment?

Current work in the area of nanophotonics is very exciting. Researchers are investigating new materials, structure designs, fabrication and characterisation techniques to control light propagation and light-matter interaction on the nanoscale. Some teams are working on how nanophotonics could hugely increase computing speeds. Other researchers are investigating how nanophotonics can be used to make an invisibility cloak.

Other researchers are investigating how nanophotonics can be used to make an invisibility cloak.

Who is your favourite scientist?

James Clerk Maxwell. He showed that electricity, magnetism and light are connected. Out of this work came the concept of the electromagnetic field which underpins much of our modern technology. He also made discoveries in colour vision, colour photography and the kinetic theory of gases. In the words of Einstein, Maxwell's work is the "most profound and the most fruitful that physics has experienced since the time of Newton”.

Any advice for someone considering a career in science?

Give it a try!

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